Tag Archives: photo Friday

Photo Friday – Cradle Mountain, Tasmania, Australia

21 Dec

If you’re reading this post, then the world hasn’t ended.  This is obviously great for many reasons, one of which is that you still have time to head down to Tasmania and check out Cradle Mountain!  Cradle Mountain is one of the most visited spots in Tasmania, and for good reason.  The landscape is dramatic, stunning, and feels very wild.  The hiking is some of the most beautiful we’ve done, and felt a lot like parts of Patagonia.

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Photo Friday – Angkor Wat, Cambodia

14 Dec

In case you haven’t been paying attention, we really loved hanging out in the temples in Cambodia, especially in Angkor Wat.  It’s incredibly atmospheric, especially just after dawn when the crowds haven’t completely descended on it yet.  This time of day is also good since the sun isn’t hot enough to make you feel like you might actually be cooked alive while walking around.  Lots of people don’t really take the time to walk around the backs of the temples and poke in all the nooks and crannies.  It’s a shame they are missing out on some really interesting spots, but it makes it much easier for us to get pictures that don’t include hundreds of strangers.

Photo Friday – Little Australian Crabs

7 Dec

I don’t know when I developed such  huge fascination with tiny critters like ants and crabs, but here we are so I’m just going to go with it.  We’ve spent a lot of time on beaches lately and we keep coming across these little piles of sand on the part of the beach that’s flat and wet after the tide goes out.  We didn’t think much of it at first, but after a while we realized that the pile was actually a bunch of little sand balls that were set up by these crabs.

The crab is super hard to see as he’s basically the same color and texture as the sand…

As they create tunnels (or whatever it is they are creating down there) they roll out the sand in little balls and scatter it around the entrance to their domain.

It’s all very organized, and you can tell the size of the crab by how big the sand balls it produces are.

We were at Cape Tribulation, in the northeastern part of Australia, and the beaches were totally packed with these critters.  They must have to do this every single time the tide goes out as I imagine all their work collapses at high tide.

All the non-smooth sand is really made up of their handiwork. You can even see the little paths they kept clear as they rolled everything out. Industrious little buggers.

Photo Friday – Total Solar Eclipse in Port Douglas, Australia

30 Nov

Before we even bought our first flight for this trip, we had promised my mom we’d meet her in Port Douglas, Australia for the total solar eclipse on November 14, 2012.  Honestly, I would never even have known it was happening, but the timing worked out well since we wanted to be in Australia and New Zealand for this summer.

I remember seeing one partial eclipse as a kid, but this was before the days of disposable eclipse viewing glasses so all I really remember is constructing those little cardboard viewing boxes and seeing the shadow they created.

This time around we were armed with multiple pairs of glasses, including the extra sets we used to cover our camera lenses with.  Interestingly, the only time that you don’t need the glasses is during the ‘totality’ when you can look at the ring of light directly.

It had been cloudy and raining the two days prior to the event, and we were very worried that we wouldn’t get to see it all happen.  Fortunately the morning was only partly cloudy and even though our view was obstructed sometimes, we did get to see many phases of the eclipse, and we even got a shot of the totality before the clouds took over.  The most amazing thing was the eerie silver appearance everything took on just before the drop into darkness that comes with the totality.

It was easily one of the more spectacular things we’ve seen and we’re excited that there will be one crossing over North America on August 21, 2017.  Total eclipses occur nearly every year, but are only visible within a narrow corridor, and not on every continent.  For more information check out NASA’s eclipse webpage.

The professionals get much better shots with their giant lenses and official eclipse lens covers (as opposed to say…taping a pair of cardboard eclipse glasses over the lens of your camera…not like I know anyone who did that…) but you get the idea with these.

The very beginning

Totality. This looks like it was taken in black and white, but it wasn’t.

Photo Friday – Australian Ants

23 Nov

Ants are crazy.  Maybe it sounds strange, but we’ve noticed that ants here in Australia are much more fascinating than the ones we see at home generally.  I won’t wax poetic about these tiny creatures, but I will say that the amazing thing about what’s happening here is that the two leaves the ants are bridging are from separate trees.  Justin spotted them when they had a huge swarming bridge formed, but just as I got there to check it out a gust of wind came and ripped them apart.  We stood watching these guys climb on top of each other by the dozen until they just barely connected again.  I grabbed this shot just as a small breeze came along and stretched this little guy to his limit.

Photo Friday – Cambodian Wat

2 Nov

One of our favorite parts about traveling in Southeast Asia is wandering around in dusty little towns and then stumbling upon hidden gems, like this wat, which we discovered one day while we were riding bikes around the outskirts of Siem Reap.  The temple complexes are often much bigger than they appear at first glance, and we love the bright colors that contrast some of the very old bits of stonework.

 

 

Photo Friday – Bali Dragonfly

26 Oct

Last week we were checking out some of the exotic flowers here on Bali and we came across this friendly dragonfly.  He hung out on this flower, staying very still and cocking his little head at me while I took at least a dozen photos.  I got the distinct impression he was as curious about me as I was about him.  After I capped my lens he went about his business and eventually flitted away.

Photo Friday – Himalayan Horses

19 Oct

We’re getting ready to post our ‘Nepal Roundup’ early next week and we came across this snapshot while we were sifting through our Nepal photos.  These types of horse caravans carry everything from construction supplies to fresh eggs to some of the hardest to reach villages along the Annapurna Circuit.  The men who lead the horses walk beside them and direct them almost entirely with different whistling sounds.  On this particular day it was incredibly foggy and at times we couldn’t see more than 10 or 15 feet in front of us.  The horses wear bells to alert walkers to their presence and we heard this caravan for quite a while before we came out of the mist and almost crashed right into them!

Photo Friday – Carved Figures in Cambodia

12 Oct

Ankgor Wat is undoubtedly the biggest tourist draw for the temples outside of Siem Reap in Cambodia, but there is so much more if you have a day or five to explore.  There are dozens of smaller temples in the surrounding area and most of them boast intricate carvings, some of which are very well preserved.  These particular figures can be found along the walls near the Elephant Gate, and we were fascinated by the different colors each figure had taken on despite the fact that they are all basically exposed to the same natural elements.  Some were simply grey as the stone they’d been carved from, others were shades of green and red.  Each figure is unique, and we spent nearly an hour wandering along the wall and inspecting the the details.

Photo Friday – Offerings in Bali

5 Oct

We were fortunate to be touring temples in Ubud, Bali during a holiday based around the full moon (though the celebration only happens either twice per year, or once every seven months…we keep getting conflicting information).  The temples were packed with locals, the women dressed in brightly colored silks while the men wore crisp white shirts and patterned sarongs.   We hung around on the sidelines and watched dozens of women parade by, carrying the offerings – gigantic platters of fruits, roasted duck, and sweets – on their heads.

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